Ann Arbor Sports Equipment Sanitizing

734-274-2659

Monday-Friday 10am-6pm EST

Ann Arbor Sports Equipment Sanitizing Blog

  • What is Embroidery?

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    21 days

    What’s the Stitch?

    Plain Boring Tee

    Branded Apparel



    Here at Ann Arbor Tees, our fastest growing service is custom embroidered garments. Embroidery is the craft of decorating fabric or other materials with a needle and thread. Both human hands and machines can perform this process. While embroidering by hand may add a personal touch, here at Ann Arbor T-shirt Company, our need for speed drives us to use embroidery machines. Our machines can embroider between 700-950 stitches per minute. The machines also have 15 needle heads that allow for 15 different customized colors of thread!

    Although this person may be great at this, there is no way one person can stitch faster than one of our machines

    Is embroidery right for you?

    Custom embroidery is versatile and can be done on many different materials. Certain styles, such as polos, hats, jackets, and bags are ideal for embroidery. Want your employees to look sharp on the job? Polos and button downs embroidered with your company logo send a statement of high quality standards. They also double as cheap advertising! Need to make sure your players know what team they’re on? Embroidered hats and jerseys make any team stand out!



    We can take your image and turn it into a stitched masterpiece that will surely impress everyone. First you send us an image ( jpg, pdf, ai, psd, or other formats), then we take that image and turn it into a digital format that the embroidery machine can read. This new art file will tell the machine exactly how to lay down all of your stitches. This process is called digitization.

    Do we really have a cool laser that lasers garments?

    Yes we do! We also embroider applique on garments which does require the use of a pretty sweet laser that would make any villain jealous.

    Applique makes your design stand out from the crowd and gives it a beautiful touch of silky smooth color. This is mostly used for hockey jerseys and Greek letter apparel. However, this is sometimes preferable to conventional embroidery. We will be happy to help decide come up with the best method for your need. Letters and numbers really pop with applique. We embroider garments for all fraternities and sororities and have the proper licensing too!

    Greek life apparel is one of our major applique sellers.

    Want to see it in action?

    Here we are stitching out a logo for U.S. Wine Imports, one of our fine customers. Custom embroidery takes time to finish so in a sense it gets better with age, just like a fine wine. We will be expanding our online resources in the future to show you how the process works.

    Interested in your own embroidery?

    Whether you’re a hockey player, a small business owner, involved in Greek life, or anything else, custom embroidery looks classy. So, if you can’t wait to get started, be sure to fill out the ‘request a quote’ along the side of this page. Our super helpful sales team will get back to you within 24 hours!


    Tags: #custom embroidery, #embroidered shirts, #custom jerseys, #how to order a shirt, #custom design, #custom apparel, #corporate apparel
  • What is Applique?

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    24 days

    Every Kiss Begins with Applique!

    Applique can make any garment stand out among the hordes of plain boring garments.



    If that picture wasn’t convincing enough, read on to discover why applique may be the right choice for you.


    Applique? Sounds fancy...

    The word "appliqué" derives from the French verb "appliquer," meaning "to put on." Applique is a sewing technique that involves stitching a small piece of fabric onto a larger one to make a pattern or design. We start by stitching the piece of applique to the shirt in the shape of your design. Then, a laser cuts where the design was stitched so we can remove the excess material around the outline.

    Stitching out design Cutting with Laser Pulling off excess applique  Finished product

    Looks sweet! How’d we do that?

    One of the disadvantages of applique is the risk of fraying and unraveling. This is due to the applique being stitched on top of the shirt. Since it is higher than the surface of the shirt, it is more likely to get caught on something. However, the embroidery pros at Ann Arbor Tees prevent this from happening by stitching an outline around the design with thread.

    The purple stitch outline over the edges of the design holds it in place and makes it more polished.

    The purple stitch outline over the edges of the design holds it in place and makes it more polished.

    Before applique machines, people had to hand cut the applique. They would then hand stitch the applique to the fabric. This method took a considerable amount of time and was prone to errors. That’s why the Ann Arbor T-shirt Company has the help of the embroidery laser and embroidery sewing machine. They get applique jobs done fast and accurate.

    The purple stitch outline over the edges of the design holds it in place and makes it more polished.

    The purple stitch outline over the edges of the design holds it in place and makes it more polished.

    Some companies may glue applique to fabrics or use a heat press. However, Ann Arbor Tees does not offer this type of embroidery. Glued applique does not stay on your clothes near as long as embroidered applique. Also, it tends to look unprofessional, especially when compared with machine cut and sewn applique. We will discuss this further in our next blog post in this series, Glue, Laser, Scissors.

    So, who is applique right for?

    Anyone who wants a clean cut and professional look should consider applique. Our top customers for applique garments are hockey teams and Greek organizations like sororities and fraternities. Beautifully embroidered applique names, numbers, and logos will make any sports team look like they belong in the pros. As Jack, our jersey expert, says, “The Stylish Team will Always Win.” No one wants to look like the pick-up hockey team from around the block.

    Interested in your own applique garments?

    If so, be sure to contact one of our super helpful sales reps by filling out the quote request form


    Tags: #custom jerseys, #how to order a shirt, #greek letters, #custom apparel, #applique
  • Applique Up Close

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    24 days

    Glue, Laser, Scissors



    Quality applique is difficult...

    small child (one of our competitors)

    Pictured: one of our competitors

    It’s especially difficult when done by hand. The human element means no guarantee that each cut out is exactly the same. As a result, hand cut applique can end up looking like a toddler made a mess no one wants (unless it is a gift from an actual toddler who put much time and love into it). This is one of the reasons why we don’t hand cut applique. Also, it would take a long time to hand cut all that imperfect applique.

    If you enjoy having crusty, flaky applique, the glued-on option is right for you. Again, the human element introduces a lot of opportunity for mistakes. We like our designs secure with no risk of falling off of your shirt. Thanks to advancements in embroidery machinery we can eliminate all these problems!

    Fire the “Laser”

    With our machine guided laser, we can produce designs accurately and in a much shorter amount of time. While regular embroidery doesn’t use the laser, it’s key for quality applique. So, digitized applique files contain the laser’s cutting instructions.

    Except that one time ...

    Except that one time ...

    Know how the President’s nuclear briefcase requires a key to activate? Well, you can sleep soundly because so does our laser! This safety measure ensures that no one uses it for evil.

    After activating the laser with the key, the embroidery operator uses only a couple buttons. The laser does the rest of the work. Once the laser cutting finishes, the operator removes the excess fabric. The machine resumes stitching the final touches.

    Will machines replace us all?

    Yes, inevitably.

    And the results are in…

    So, we’ve bragged a lot about how sweet our laser is, but that’s enough talk. Why don’t we show you what our laser can do?

    Straight lines and not a single loose thread

    These intricate designs are exact copies, a feat no one could accomplish by hand.


    Total customization means so many possibilities!

    Make sure everyone knows who’s got the coolest jerseys - perfect for names & numbers on the back and even the shoulders.


    Represent! Represent! We offer multi-color applique too!

    Also great for raves! UNCE, UNCE, UNCE


    Whether you’re a hockey player, a small business owner, involved in Greek life, or anything else, laser-guided applique looks real classy. So, if you’re interested in what you see here, be sure to fill out the ‘request a quote’ in the column next to this page. We’ll be happy to answer any questions!


    Tags: #applique, #embroidery
  • Serigraphy: Screenprinting Gets Classy

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    about 1 month

    As discussed in our previous blog, Ready for the Closeup: Photographic Screens, screen printing was a major industry by the 1930’s. In 1933, Franklin Delano Roosevelt created, as part of the New Deal, the Work Projects Administration (WPA). He created the WPA to help employ Americans during the Great Depression. In fact, the WPA became one of the first U.S. Government programs to support the arts. Many workers screen printed screen the WPA's very own posters and signs. However, some screen printers desired to distance artistic printing from its' industrial process roots. So, they renamed screen printing the more hoity-toity sounding “Serigraphy”.

    WPA poster encouraging laborers to work for America

    WPA poster encouraging laborers to work for America

    Seri-what?

    Serigraph comes from the latin prefix “seri”, meaning silk, and also the Greek (to sound extra pompous) “graphos or graphein”, meaning to write. In 1940, a group of artists began the National Serigraph Society. Their goal was to display and promote serigraphy throughout the world. Screen printing reached new heights as a respected art with hamburger eating pop artist Andy Warhol. His experiments with screen printing in the 1960’s brought it to the mainstream.

    Before Andy Warhol, most screen printers kept their screen printing techniques as “trade secrets”. Like the ancient Chinese, they wished to preserve their hold on the industry. Andy Warhol popularized screen printing by using other pop icons of American culture. Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, and even Campbell's soup cans became printed masterpieces. With screen printing, Warhol could print large quantities of his work. This helped spread his images around the world.

    What about industry?

    Around this time, screen printing also gained traction in garment fabrication. Before 1960 most screen presses could only handle one layer of printing. A printer would load a screen into position and push the ink through. Then if the design needed another screen or color, the printer would swap the old screen out for a new one. In 1960, Michael Vasilantone filed a patent for a rotary press or rotary garment. This machine could apply many layers and colors to a print in quick succession, boosting production speed.

    Modern screen printing...

    Ann Arbor Tees’ very own artists at their ‘easels’

    Ann Arbor Tees’ very own artists at their ‘easels’

    With the integration of computers into mainstream production, screen printing became even easier. Artists can create their design in Photoshop, Illustrator, or other image creation software. Then they typically separate the design into one color per screen.

    Next, a machine prints the design on transparent films. The films are then overlaid on the screens and exposed to UV light. Some businesses even use a special machine called a Direct to Screen (DTS) instead of films. After all the screens are exposed and washed out, they are loaded into a manual or automated press. Some automated presses can move a garment through more than a dozen different screens. This allows for more complex designs and much faster printing.

    Ann Arbor T-shirt Company’s very own automated presses help ensure our lighting fast turnaround!



    The improvements of screen printing’s speed, accuracy, and detail are staggering. Yet, the fundamentals have changed very little over the years. People still enjoy printing their own works of art much like their ancestors in ancient caves. Given its’ long history, it seems unlikely that screen printing has many more earth-shattering changes in store, but its’ sound past will keep us printing into the future!

    Want to join in the future of screen printing yourself? Check out our job listings and fill out an application today!



    References

    1. http://www.ooshirts.com/guides/History-of-Screen-Printing.html
    2. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/prehistoric/hand-stencils-rock-art.htm
    3. http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/publishing/articles/105324.aspx
    4. http://revolverwarholgallery.com/andy-warhol-screenprints-process-history/
    5. https://www.dfcscreenprinting.com/blog/the-history-of-silk-screen-printing.html
    6. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/printmaking/screen-printing.htm
    7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk
    8. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_printing
    9. http://www.gwent.org/gem_screen_printing.html#history
    10. Book - Mental Floss History of the World
    11. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimeograph
    12. http://homepage.usask.ca/~nis715/scrnprnt.html

    Tags: #screen printing, #learn about printing, #history, #america, #employment
  • What is Digitization?

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    about 1 month

    Digitize Me, Cap’n!

    Embroidery digitization is the process of converting existing artwork, like a company logo or team emblem, into a stitch file that an embroidery machine can sew onto a garment. Before we can embroider any design, we must digitize it first. Digitizing is a complex process that is both art and science. The digitizer must plot out how the continuous threads of different colors will shape the design. After we digitize the art, we send it over to the embroidery machine.




    From the original design

    digitized into a stitch file

    and finally embroidered onto the garment!








    What can we digitize?

    Sorry, stick-man

    Almost any design can be digitized. Yet, embroidery limits the appearance of a design not created for printing. Small letters, tiny details or color gradients are difficult to reproduce with thread. We recommend high quality images. Otherwise, the digitization process may not turn out how you expect. Hand drawn images might work but are usually a no-no.



    Why can’t we embroider this design?

    Designs with a crazy amount of colors won’t work because embroidery machines can only stitch 15 different colors at once. Also the machine will have to stop to trim the thread to switch to each color. This will add more time and make the design more bulky with all those start and stop points. For example…


    The second design here is particularly difficult because of the rainbow color gradient. No one makes thread that slowly fades into another color. We need to use a digital print to capture the full color of these designs.

    Designs with a lot of shading do not work, even if it's all one primary color. The machine would need a different thread color for every difference in shade. However, stitching that many threads into one design is not possible. For example...









    Even with a few solid colors, some designs are too intricate to embroider. Embroidery lacks the precision needed for small details. For example...



    For similar reasons, designs with small lettering (smaller than .2 inches tall which is about a 20-22 point font size on screen) do not work well. The smaller the lettering, the harder it is to read. The letters will look scrunched and too close together. For example…



    So, what designs will work?

    Finally, here are a couple examples of designs that will come out looking great…



    Ready to talk?

    Have a logo you’d like digitized and embroidered? Be sure to fill out the form next to this post. We will contact you shortly!


    Tags: #embroidery, #how to order a shirt, #custom design, #custom apparel
  • Ready for the Closeup: Photographic Screens

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    about 1 month
    the secret to the screen printer’s tan

    The secret to the screen printer’s tan

    As we discussed in our previous post, Let Them Screen Prints!: Production for the Masses, many technological advances eased the difficulties of screen printing. It emerged from the Industrial Revolution as a streamlined, mass production process. However, there were still many advances to come. Around 1911 to 1915, Roy Beck, Charles Peter, and Edward Owens began experimenting with the first photographic screens. Photographic screens use a UV sensitive photo emulsion (glue-like goo). Coating the screen was usually done by filling up a trough and dragging it across the surface. When hardened, the emulsion produced a uniform coating that was water soluble.

    An artist’s image would be created as a stencil or on a transparent film. The artist then placed the image between a light source and the hardened screen. The water soluble emulsion became water resistant when light shined over its hardened state for a time. Light passing through everywhere not blocked by the artist's design would make the desired areas water resistant.

    Say goodbye to stencil ties!

    A. Ink  B. Squeegee  C. Image  D. Silk Screen  E. Screen Frame  F. Printed Image - Image by Harry Wad

    A. Ink B. Squeegee C. Image D. Silk Screen E. Screen Frame F. Printed Image - Image by Harry Wad

    The artist could then wash out the still water soluble emulsion. This left the water resistant emulsion in the shape of the artist's design. As a result, “ties” were no longer needed and worrying about image and font size became much less of a concern. Photographic screens allowed for the printed design to exactly match that of the artist’s original. Printers still use photosensitive screens to capture their designs down to the smallest details.

    Now, what to print?

    Stop and head directly to the next post!

    Stop and head directly to the next post!

    As time progressed, screen printing found one of its first large boons in industry production with the need for street signs. As more cars and roads cropped up all over the world, everyone needed more signs to aid navigation. Screen printing was favored because it could reproduce an exact image in large quantities. As industrial screen printing of signs, linen, and wallpaper grew, an artistic interest in screen printing took hold. Read on to our next blog, Serigraphy: Screen Printing Gets Classy, to learn more about the uses of screen printing in art and industry.



    References

    1. http://www.ooshirts.com/guides/History-of-Screen-Printing.html
    2. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/prehistoric/hand-stencils-rock-art.htm
    3. http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/publishing/articles/105324.aspx
    4. http://revolverwarholgallery.com/andy-warhol-screenprints-process-history/
    5. https://www.dfcscreenprinting.com/blog/the-history-of-silk-screen-printing.html
    6. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/printmaking/screen-printing.htm
    7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk
    8. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_printing
    9. http://www.gwent.org/gem_screen_printing.html#history
    10. Book - Mental Floss History of the World
    11. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimeograph
    12. http://homepage.usask.ca/~nis715/scrnprnt.html

    Tags: #screen printing, #learn about printing, #history
  • Let Them Screen Prints!: Production for the Masses

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    about 2 months

    As we discussed in our previous post, For Their Dyes Only: the Secret of Silk, printing in its early forms had been around for hundreds of years. However, the scientific and technological advances of the industrial revolution reinvented the practice. Screen printing began to focus on streamlined mass production as opposed to the painstaking craft of yore. Some of the earliest machine printing with stencils started during the late 1880's.

    How did printers copy an image?

    This mimeograph could crank out exact image copies

    This mimeograph could crank out exact image copies

    At that time, both the US and the UK created their own processes, known respectively as Mimeograph and Cyclostyle. Both countries used machines with handcrafted stencils on waxed mulberry paper. The same mulberry trees the silkworms eat actually made up the paper. The paper stencils were then fastened onto the ink-filled drum of a rotary machine. By turning a crank, a piece of paper would feed through the machine while the ink-filled drum turned. A crude squeegee would press ink through the mesh of the drum and print the image from the stencil.

    What was the downside?

    The handmade stencils, although a breakthrough in the craft of printing, were quite fragile. Also, letters and designs that had free-floating centers needed to be connected or “tied” to the stencil. Otherwise, the design would lose that detail. For example, the middle of the letter “O” would fall off without any ties and a filled in circle would result. Although they changed the physical look of letters some, ties kept the end result recognizable. Size was also a major concern because if the details were too small, the stencil would be too fragile to support itself. As a result, the handmade stencils limited artists to large designs and fonts that could support the detail.

    Stencils, Substrates, and Silk Screens!

    Screen printing soon incorporated many of these new ideas into its’ own process. In 1907, Samuel Simon of Manchester England gained a patent for using silk to support a stencil. He used a brush to press the paint through the silk mesh and onto the substrate (anything one prints on). At the time, silkscreening was mainly used on wallpaper and linen. In 1920, Albert Kosloff gave a demonstration printing ink through a screen using a squeegee. The squeegees soon replaced brushes. Printers still use squeegees today either drawn across a screen manually or clamped into an automated press.

    A. Ink  B. Squeegee  C. Image  D. Silk Screen  E. Screen Frame  F. Printed Image - Image by Harry Wad

    A. Ink B. Squeegee C. Image D. Silk Screen E. Screen Frame F. Printed Image - Image by Harry Wad

    More advances in screen printing were soon to come. Read on to our next blog, Ready for the Closeup: Photographic Screens, to learn how the invention of photographic screens allowed for more detailed prints.



    References

    1. http://www.ooshirts.com/guides/History-of-Screen-Printing.html
    2. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/prehistoric/hand-stencils-rock-art.htm
    3. http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/publishing/articles/105324.aspx
    4. http://revolverwarholgallery.com/andy-warhol-screenprints-process-history/
    5. https://www.dfcscreenprinting.com/blog/the-history-of-silk-screen-printing.html
    6. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/printmaking/screen-printing.htm
    7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk
    8. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_printing
    9. http://www.gwent.org/gem_screen_printing.html#history
    10. Book - Mental Floss History of the World
    11. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimeograph
    12. http://homepage.usask.ca/~nis715/scrnprnt.html

    Tags: #screen printing, #learn about printing, #history
  • For Their Dyes Only: the Secret of Silk

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    about 2 months

    In our previous post, The Hairy Origins of Screen Printing, we discussed the Chinese invention of screen printing using human hair. This post will cover how the next big advance in screen printing began with the discovery of silk in China. Silk comes from the cocoon of the mulberry silk moth (Bombyx mori, for those who care or pretend to read latin). The caterpillar spins its cocoon from a single thread of hardened spit measuring close to 1000 yards. China started weaving silk around 3,000 BCE, even further back than the Pyramids of Giza.

    Who exactly discovered silk?

    That’s almost enough silk to cover your thumb!

    That’s almost enough silk to cover your thumb!

    According to an old Confucius legend, the Chinese Empress Leizu discovered silk when a cocoon fell into her tea and unraveled. The empress then had the clever idea to weave some of it in a loom. However silk got its start, China’s new fabric became a luxury produced only for the royal family and those they deemed worthy.

    So, how did silk spread?

    They better not find any holes

    They better not find any holes

    Eventually, the rules about who could wear silk became more relaxed. It soon became a huge source of revenue for traders and merchants who would pay for silk’s weight in gold. As a result, China maintained a monopoly on silk production and all things related. This meant the weaving process, the caterpillars, and the mulberry leaves they ate all became a carefully guarded secret. Unfortunately, loose lips, bribery, theft, and kidnappings of workers spread the secret. Soon, smugglers carried worms to countries like Korea, Japan, and India. These countries spun their own unique threads into the process.

    What started as fashion for the wealthy elite soon spread all along the “silk road” and into Europe in the 1700’s. As silk became more widespread and less expensive, people found its uses in all manner of things. By 1870, France began using silk stretched over wood frames for printing textiles. These silk screens worked much better than the rough cotton and human hair screens of the past.

    Is silk still used in screen printing?

    The new silk meshes resulted in the term “silkscreening.” Printers still use this term today even though most mesh screens are now polyester, nylon or even metal. These materials are stronger, do not unravel in water, and aren’t dyed by the inks and pigments used. More great technological developments would unfold as the need for screen printing grew. Read on to our next post, Let Them Screen Prints!: Production for the Masses, to learn how the Industrial Revolution changed screen printing.



    References

    1. http://www.ooshirts.com/guides/History-of-Screen-Printing.html
    2. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/prehistoric/hand-stencils-rock-art.htm
    3. http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/publishing/articles/105324.aspx
    4. http://revolverwarholgallery.com/andy-warhol-screenprints-process-history/
    5. https://www.dfcscreenprinting.com/blog/the-history-of-silk-screen-printing.html
    6. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/printmaking/screen-printing.htm
    7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk
    8. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_printing
    9. http://www.gwent.org/gem_screen_printing.html#history
    10. Book - Mental Floss History of the World
    11. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimeograph
    12. http://homepage.usask.ca/~nis715/scrnprnt.html

    Tags: #screen printing, #learn about printing, #history
  • The Hairy Origins of Screen Printing

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    2 months

    Screen printing is the process of pushing ink through a mesh screen to create a print. A stencil of the design blocks off some of the ink in the shape of the desired print. This basic technique has changed little over the course of thousands of years. Yet, major technological advances helped printers adapt to a growing demand.

    Both the use of stencils and the creation of printed images are some of the oldest forms of human expression. Some span all the way back to 40,000 BCE. Researchers have found examples of prehistoric art in countries around the world. This includes France, Spain, Australia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, and Belize. It is no wonder then that printed images are still used in so much of our daily lives.

    How did printing begin?

    Can you tell the positive from the negative?

    Can you tell the positive from the negative?

    Oftentimes, our ancient ancestors made images on the surface of cave walls using nothing more than their hands. They created these prehistoric designs as either a print or a stencil. The prints, known as “Positive Handprints” were usually red, white or black pigment that coated the artist’s hand. The artist then pressed the pigment coated hand against the surface of a rock, leaving a rough handprint behind. Ancient artists created the stencil version or “Negative Hand Stencils” by first laying their hand on a flat surface. They then sprayed over the hand and surface by blowing pigment through a reed or bone, or even spitting it from their mouths. This method left behind an outline of the hand.

    What about screen printing?

    The original ink printer?

    The original ink printer?

    Early examples of printing with small seals and stamps exist in China, Mesopotamia, and Egypt. However, China boasts of the origin of screen printing during the Song Dynasty (960-1279 CE). A wooden frame and human hair for mesh composed the first printing screens. Hair was strong enough to hold a stencil in place. Hair was also fine enough to allow the colored vegetable dyes and pigments to pass through the unobstructed spaces and onto the substrate. The substrate is the fancy industry term for whatever needs printed on.

    China eventually improved on these hairy screens with their most precious secret, silk. Read on to our next blog, For Their Dyes Only: the Secret of Silk, to learn about the importance of silk in ancient China and the origin of silk screening.



    References

    1. http://www.ooshirts.com/guides/History-of-Screen-Printing.html
    2. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/prehistoric/hand-stencils-rock-art.htm
    3. http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/publishing/articles/105324.aspx
    4. http://revolverwarholgallery.com/andy-warhol-screenprints-process-history/
    5. https://www.dfcscreenprinting.com/blog/the-history-of-silk-screen-printing.html
    6. http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/printmaking/screen-printing.htm
    7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk
    8. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_printing
    9. http://www.gwent.org/gem_screen_printing.html#history
    10. Mental Floss History of the World
    11. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimeograph
    12. http://homepage.usask.ca/~nis715/scrnprnt.html

    Tags: #screen printing, #learn about printing, #history
  • Breaking News: Patagonia apparel has arrived!

    By: Rachel T, rachel.t@annarbortees.com

    4 months

    Chances are, if you ask someone what their favorite quarter zip, fleece zip-up, or rain jacket is, they’ll tell you it’s their Patagonia.





    Patagonia is a brand known for their quality outdoor apparel and gear. They donate 1% of their sales to environmental groups and they are constantly working to reduce their manufacturing harms by using organic cotton and recycled fabrics. They also actively campaign for saving forests and increasing time off and benefits for American families. Basically, we think they’re pretty cool and that they make some sweet apparel.

    So we decided to partner with them

    And we’re so excited about our new partnership that we’re dedicating an entire blog post to it! Check out some of the apparel you can order:



    The perfect backpack for hiking through the woods or just trekking across campus.


    Is there anything better than being both stylish and comfortable? (Spoiler: no, there’s not)


    Our smiles are just as big as this model’s when we wear Patagonia rain jackets!

    A few quick tips for ordering custom Patagonia apparel:

    All gear has to be purchased as part of a group uniform or work-wear. That means that even though you can’t order just one jacket for yourself, you can order jackets for your entire group! Also, all gear needs to be decorated with an approved logo. In other words, if you order Patagonia apparel through us, we have to customize it in some way with a decoration.

    One more pro tip: if you want to order some custom Patagonia gear, make sure you plan in advance! This stuff has longer turnaround time than our standard offerings, so you’ll need to give us a couple weeks’ notice. But as long as you order early, it’s totally worth it!

    Think it can’t get any better? It can!

    You also get sweet discounts! You can get up to 40% off of original retail prices depending on how many pieces you order. Yep, you read that right….that’s 40% off if you have a large order!

    If you’ve never felt like this guy while wearing custom apparel, then you’ve been wearing the wrong custom apparel.

    If you love Patagonia as much as we do, let us know! Fill out this form and we will get started. We’re happy to help you with an order, or just chat about Patagonia, custom tees, or life in general.


    Tags: #partnerships